Manheim-Australian-Market-Report-Q3-2016 - Page 9

Local News Australian Market Report Q3 Aussie Bosch engineers come up with parts giant’s most advanced automated vehicle By Ian Porter GoAuto News Premium Victorian minister for road safety Luke Donnellan said the adoption of automated vehicles would be a big step towards achieving the TAC’s goal of eliminating road fatalities by 2055. Following on from the article on what Australian drivers think of autonomous vehicles, we now look at one example of how the technology is becoming a reality on Australian roads, courtesy of GoAuto News. Working together with the Transport Accident Commission (TAC), the Victorian government and VicRoads, Bosch recently unveiled an autonomous vehicle built in Victoria. E ngineers at German parts giant Bosch’s Clayton technical centre east of Melbourne have developed a highly advanced automated car – billed as the first of its kind in this country – in a bid to keep Australia at the forefront of the emerging vehicle technology. Based on the Tesla Model S electric-powered luxury sedan, the rolling technology showcase was developed with $1.2 million assistance from the Victorian government and was first demonstrated on a closed course at Melbourne’s Formula One Grand Prix track at Albert Park on the eve of the recent Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) World Congress. Source: http://www.goauto.com.au/mellor/mellor.nsf/story2/DC04DFB459CDB169CA258045001090A9 Unveiling the car, Bosch Australia president Gavin Smith said it was the fifth autonomous vehicle built within the global Bosch Group – and the most advanced – and that the project may have secured Australia a role in the ongoing development of automated systems for incorporation into production cars. Through the Transport Accident Commission (TAC), the Victorian government contributed $1.2 million toward development costs, with VicRoads also playing a key role in the project. “This project has been enabled and facilitated by the Bosch group in co-operation with the Victorian government, the TAC and VicRoads – without that cooperation, it may not have been possible,” Mr Smith said. “Having done this, we are now very confident we will continue to invest and we will see the technology further developed here in Australia.” “The capability that existed here and had been built up over those decades, we now protect by developing new technology that allows us to be involved in global projects for customers in all corners of the world.” Behind the wheel of Victoria’s first locally developed autonomous vehicle Victorian minister for road safety Luke Donnellan said the adoption of automated vehicles would be a big step towards achieving the TAC’s goal of eliminating road fatalities by 2055. “This is a very important day for Victoria in terms of where our future lies,” he said. “For me as road safety minister, it’s about how we can get the lives lost on our roads down to zero. That’s a big challenge we need to do together, whether through the infrastructure, technology or through changing behaviour. “Bosch can develop these technologies but they need to work in a partnership with the TAC and the state government so we can develop protocols so these cars can run safely on our roads and so that those people who are driving (conventional cars) can interact safely with driverless vehicles. “That will be a challenge for the state government over the next 10 years, as to how we develop the rules, regulations and the like to ensure we encourage innovation but in a very safe way.” It is not currently legal to operate an automated car on Victorian roads. Acting VicRoads chief executive Peter Todd told GoAuto that the organisation – as the roads and traffic authority in the state – was vitally involved in the project so it could keep abreast of developments and understand the challenges that will come with automated vehicles. > 9