Gulf Coast Fisherman Magazine VOL 40 No 3 - SUMMER 2016 - Page 22

F L O R I D A A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y G U L F to C a p t i v a P a s s Forecast Adjustment Times Florida Reefs to Midnight Pass Point Ybel (0.4 mi. nw) ....... -1:00 Captiva Pass ......................... -1:20 Gasparilla Pass ..................... -1:45 Venice Inlet .......................... -2:20 Midnight Past (ent.) ............. -1:50 Sarasota Bay Big Sarasota Pass ................. -2:10 New Pass .............................. -3:00 Longboat Pass ...................... -2:55 Cortez (N. of bridge) ............ -1:25 Tampa Bay Tampa Bay Ent. ................... Same Mullet Key Channel (ent ...... -0:15 Passage Key Inlet ................. -1:15 Bunces Pass .......................... -1:00 Tampa Bay (cont'd) Cats Point ............................. -2:55 Sunshine Skyway Bridge ..... -0:15 Joe Island (1.8 mi. NW) ....... -0:20 Pinellas Pt. (0.5 mi.le SE) .... -1:30 Ross Island .......................... +1:10 Courtney Campbell Pkwy ... +0:45 Catfish Point (1.3 mi. east) . +0:30 Boca Ciega Bay Pass-a-Grille Channel ............ -:55 Blind Pass (north end) .......... -1:40 Johns Pass ............................ -1:45 The Narrows ........................ -1:00 Apalachee Bay St. Marks River .................... -1:00 Four Mile Pt. ........................ -0:40 St. Marks ............................. +0:50 To adjust for your fishing area, add (+) or subtract (-) hours and minutes shown above for the area you plan to fish from the Forecast time. No attempt should be made to compare the time of high or low tide, shown below, to the times of current presented in the Fishing Forecast. Tide Table Adjustment Times HIGH LOW Cape Romano -1:22 Naples (outer coast) -2:04 Estero Bay Little Hickory I. -0:58 Carlos Pt. -1:08 Matanzas Pass -1:10 San Carlos Bay Point Ybel -1:50 Punta Rassa -1:01 Caloosahatchee River Iona Shores +1:08 Cape Coral Bridge +1:15 Fort Myers +2:08 St. James City, Pine I. -0:30 Captiva Island (outside)-2:20 Captiva Island (P. I. Sd)-0:46 Redfish Pass -0:55 Matlacha Pass +0:43 Punta Gorda Charlotte Harbor +1:06 Shell Pt.-Peace River +1:52 Englewood, Lemon Bay -0:57 Venice Inlet -2:02 Sarasota Bay Sarasota -1:38 Cortez -2:00 -1:06 -2:07 -1:05 -1:28 -1:34 -1:12 -1:19 +1:40 +2:02 +2:44 -0:44 -2:28 -0:20 -1:14 +1:28 +1:27 +2:30 -0:40 -1:38 -0:58 -1:25 HIGH LOW Tampa Bay Egmont Key (channel) -2:27 -2:24 Anna Maria -2:07 -2:31 Bradenton, Manatee. -1:24 -0:55 Redfish Point -0:30 +0:14 Mullet Key Channel -2:22 -1:58 Shell Point +0:08 +0:17 Point Pinellas -0:22 -0:29 St. Petersburg Same Hillsborough Bay +0:07 +0:26 Boca Ciega Bay Pass-A-Grille Beach -1:34 -1:30 Gulfport -1:32 -1:05 John's Pass -2:14 -2:04 Clearwater -1:50 -1:35 Anclote Keys, Sound -1:47 -1:46 Tarpon Springs -0:50 -0:41 St. George Sound Dog Island (west end) +0:07 +0:06 Carrabelle River +0:35 +0:31 St. George Island (east)-0:15 +0:06 Apalachicola Bay Cat Point +1:20 +1:27 Apalachicola +2:00 +2:44 Lower Anchorage +1:43 +2:09 West Pass +1:33 +2:17 The daily tide tables are to be used only as a depth of water guide and have no correlation to the maximum times of current. To adjust for your fishing area, add (+) hours/minutes or deduct (-)hours/minutes shown above to the times of hi or low as indicated by the tide tables. Pompano (Continued from page 7.) Bait shops seldom sell ghost shrimp so anglers need to catch their own. For many dedicated pompano fishermen, the day begins walking along the beach looking for ghost shrimp holes. When they find some, sportsmen suck the little crustaceans out of their holes with specially made plunger-like sand pumps. Some people make their own pumps from PVC pipe. “We go out at low tide to catch them in knee-deep water,” Young advised. “We don’t usually have to go any deeper than waist deep. Sometimes, we find them on an exposed sandbar. With the pump, we extract a core sample and dump it back into the water. Then, either the person with the pump or an assistant quickly scoops the shrimp with a net before the seagulls beat them to it. With two people, it can be a lot of fun catching these rascals. It’s especially fun for children to catch their own bait.” When ghost shrimp spawn, their eggs turn bright orange. Pompano look for orange in the water. Therefore, many people use special “pompano rigs” with two or three hooks capped by red or orange beads to imitate ghost shrimp eggs. People can also make their own rigs. Some people use Carolina rigs with light slip sinkers, swivels and leaders tipped with Number 1 or 1/0 hooks, but anglers can use many different rigs. “I tie on a 2-ounce pyramid sinker and make a loop knot in the line above it,” recommended Jerry Williams, an avid pompano fisherman from Orange Beach, AL. “My main line is 15-pound monofilament with a 4-foot leader of 20pound fluorocarbon, which sinks faster than mono. I rig up a ghost shrimp on a Number 1 Kahle hook. I start at the tail and thread it on the hook like a nightcrawler. I bring the hook out of the soft body and then stick the tip back into the head, the hardest part of the shrimp. When the pyramid sinker buries in the sand, I tighten my line to bring the bait just off the bottom.” Sand fleas also make excellent pompano baits. Many coastal bait stores sell these tiny crustaceans also known as mole crabs or sand crabs. Some people catch their own sand fleas by scooping special nets into the sand at the waters edge. “Sand fleas are very popular baits for pompano in Florida,” Green said. “We put one or two on a jig or just stick them on a hook with a couple split-shots on the line and drift along. We try to find a little quicker water because that stirs up the bait. Pompano like that wave action. When they hit, they really hit.” (Continued on p YH ˊBSTTTPSˈHHHˈB