CAMPUS MOMENTS JULY.2015 - Page 31

BOOK by Vimbai Chinembiri Masimba Musodza will be publishing Shavi Rechikadzi, a ChiShona language horror novel, with sexual violence as a main theme. The story connects to the international horror genre by narrating how a copy of De Vermis Mysteriis, the 700¬page grimoire penned by Belgian necromancer Ludwig Prinn just before he was executed in 1489 found its way to what is now Zimbabwe through the adventures of Zanzibari scholar, Mwalimu Jumah, a man who “enquired after things one ought not.” Since it is possible that, after all these years, Mwalimu Jumah himself may yet still live, the horrible tome may make several appearances in Zimbabwean literature in the future…. Musodza will also begin to serialise readings of the novel, which, except for the last part, will be freely available online as podcasts. The author hopes to generate enough interest among the Shona¬speaking communities, especially those who live in countries with developed book industries, to create the first bestseller in the language in recent times. While his publishing model is a nod to the “small press” of the typical horror writer, Musodza recognises that he is actively establishing a new avenue for African writers, especially those who, like himself, do not adhere to the “African writer” convention established by the major publishing houses, and that other Zimbabwean authors are watching carefully this new development Title: Shavi Rechikadzi Author: Masimba Musodza Publisher: Belontos Books, ISBN: 978¬1¬908690¬27¬2 Genre: Horror/Zimbabwean Fiction/Fiction in ChiShona Language:ChiShona Release Date: 16 July 2015. MUSIC “Geronimo” – Sheppard (single ). by Farai Kwesha Mainstream music can sound a little repetitive – and not reveiw just sonically. I can’t remember the last time I gasped in awe of any single artist’s lyrical mastery or creativity. Don’t get me wrong, mainstream music, however formulaic, is awesome – the catchy hooks, the tongue-in-cheek rhymes, and even the worn out themes of love, lust, hate, intoxication (or “getting high & getting wasted” as the kids like to say these days) and partying. Sometimes however, in that pleasant mess, you discover a gem like Sheppard’s Geronimo, with all the makings (clichés and all) of a run-ofthe-mill pop song, but at the same time far superior. The song opens up with subtle pulsating drums, accompanied by guitars before lead singer George Sheppard’s vocals kick in, in what is arguably one of the most gripping verses of 2015. Even this early on, the anthemic nature of the song is instantly apparent, as the verses sound like they are building up to something epic (and THAT they are). The simple, insanely catchy shout/si