Aspire Magazine 1 - Page 60

/////////////////////////////////////////// / // H AU TE FAC TOR for the water source that flows through the Willowbend community. Harvesting cranberries is not only a business but also family tradition, a trade passed down from generations. Today Quaker Run grows mostly Early Black, which grow only in Massachusetts, and Howes, both of which turn a vibrant red in fall. According to the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers’ Association, “Cranberries have pockets of air inside the fruit. Because of this, cranberries float in water, and thus, the bogs can be flooded to aid in removal of fruit from the vines. Water reels, nicknamed ‘eggbeaters’ are used to stir up the water in the bogs. By this action, cranberries are dislodged from the vines and float to the surface of the water.” The wet harvest makes for a spectacular show of nature for Willowbend residents and visitors. < SOURCED SCARLET FEVER Every autumn, Willowbend finds color and curiosity in its cranberry bogs. BY AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY FALL ON CAPE COD IS A MAGICAL TIME. Leaves are changing, crunching underfoot, tourists have returned home, quieting the streets. And if the stars align, the Red Sox are in pursuit of another pennant. Fall is also the time when cranberry bogs around Massachusetts turn red, as the native berry rises, alerting passersby to the harvest season. The Cape, it turns out, is a perfect environment in which to grow cranberries. Its acidic soil, peaty earth, and cold winters 58 ISSUE ONE | ASPIRE make the area ripe for the cultivation of cranberry vines, many of which are more than a century old. At Willowbend, the golf course was built around several cranberry bogs, still operated by the father-and-son team of Bob and Sean Halett of Quaker Run Cranberries, and named TOP: Willowbend’s cranberry bogs. OPPOSITE: The iconic barn at Willowbend; reaping fruits of cranberry labor. Every fall, friends and neighbors gather next to the clubhouse or around 15 different bog sections, some teeing off over them, others picnicking and photographing, while the Haletts flood, then corral, the berries, which are then used for juice and sauces. It’s intense work for the father, son, and their company’s small crew, which often works 10-hour days, seven days a week for five weeks during fall. And while many other local families have given up their bogs and sold their land—as crop prices decrease and corporations monopolize the fruit growing industry—the Haletts continue to honor their family business. “It’s so beautiful,” says Sean of the bogs in fall. “I’ve seen it a million times and I never get sick of seeing them.” “Water reels, nicknamed ‘eggbeaters’ are used to stir up the water in the bogs. By this action, cranberries are dislodged from the vines and float to the surface of the water.” — SEAN HALETT TASTE DURING CRANBERRY SEASON, WILLOWBEND MEMBERS CAN SIP CRANBERRY COCKTAILS BY CHERISHED BARTENDER JIM NUTTELMAN, AND SAVOR CRANBERRY-INSPIRED DISHES AT THE GRILLE ROOM BY CHEF DAWSON FROCK. ASPIRE | ISSUE ONE 59