Arctic Yearbook 2014 - Page 95

Arctic Yearbook 2014 95 other provinces of Canada as there is very little international migration. Ontario is a large and increasingly important source and destination of migrants from Nunavut. In 2013, 32 percent of inter-provincial in-migration was from Ontario and 37 percent of out-migrants went to Ontario (Nunavut Bureau of Statistics, 2014). Because of a quite deliberate policy to decentralize jobs in Nunavut, Iqaluit’s share of the territory’s population has declined from 21.1 percent in 2006 to 20.3 percent in 2013, thus bucking a pattern seen in most other Arctic regions. Greenland The population of Greenland grew slowly and remained largely Inuit until Danes started to migrate to the island. In 1901, the population was 11,893 and only 2.3 percent were born outside Greenland (figure 8). Figure 8: Total population of Greenland and percent born outside Greenland, 1901-2013 60,000 25 Population Percent born outside Greenland 50,000 20 40,000 15 30,000 10 20,000 5 0 1901 1911 1921 1930 1946 1951 1956 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 10,000 0 Source: Statistics Greenland. The population grew largely because of the higher fertility of native Greenlanders and improved mortality but also partially due to the influx of outsiders from Denmark. The percent of the population born outside Greenland peaked at 19 percent in 1974 when home rule was introduced and there were fewer positions available for Danes. This period of a large share of Danes also marked the beginning of high female outmigration when Greenlandic women married Danish men who tended not to stay in Greenland permanently (Hamilton & Rasmussen, 2010). The percent of the population born outside Greenland has continued to decline as Greenlanders assert more control over their economy and government affairs and now stands at 11 percent. The population of Greenland reached 55,000 for the first time in 1989 and has grown quite slowly since then as natural increase has been almost exactly offset by out-migration. The total population size has remained remarkably stable at just over 56,000 for the past fifteen years. With increased contact with Denmark and Danish citizenship, it has been relatively easy for Greenlanders to migrate to Denmark. In 2007,   Migration in the Arctic