Arctic Yearbook 2014 - Page 428

Arctic Yearbook 2014 428 Wezeman, S.T. (2012). Military Capabilities in the Arctic. SIPRI Background Paper. March 2012. Retrieved from http://books.sipri.org/files/misc/SIPRIBP1203.pdf. Zysk, K. (2010, August). Russian perspectives on Arctic security. Baltic Rim Economies. 4(31): 17-18. Zysk, K. (2011). Military Aspects of Russia´s Arctic Policy: Hard Power and Natural Resources. In Kraska, J. (ed.) (2011). Arctic Security in an Age of Climate Change (pp. 85-106). New York: Cambridge University Press. Annex 1: Military Capabilities in the Arctic Air capabilities Canada15 - the Royal Canadian Air Force operates 18 CP-140 (P-3C) anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft that have the range to patrol the Arctic region from their base on the east coast of Canada -they will be replaced by 10–12 new aircraft from 2020 - 80 F/A-18 combat aircraft stationed in south-east and central Canada that are regularly deployed in the Arctic region, especially to intercept Russian bomber, which are supported by 7 tanker aircraft - Aircraft acquisitions in recent years, such as of C-130J and C-17 transport aircraft, have been partly for Arctic missions -Joint Uninhabited Surveillance and Target Acquisition System (JUSTAS) project for 6 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for maritime and Arctic patrol - air surveillance radars North Warning System, which forms part of the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) - plans to replace the F/A-18s with 65 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters (JSFs) from 2020 -17 search-and-rescue aircraft are plan